Joshua Redman Plugs In

“I always thought someday I’m gonna do a different kind of record. I’m gonna do a record that has more electric textures, that has wider sonic variety, I’m gonna do a record that relies more heavily on other sorts of rhythms – not just swing-bass rhythms but more backbeat rhythms… But it took me ten years to do a record like and I’ve finally done it and I’m so happy with it. It was a risk and it was a challenge but it’s been very rewarding for me.” That’s Joshua Redman talking about his new CD, Elastic, which is out tomorrow. Redman’s Elastic Band consists of Sam Yahel on multiple keyboards and Brian Blade on drums (the same group also composes YaYa3, who released their self-titled album earlier this summer). Joshua says that this music is more his own than any other music he’s ever written and that it has more of a personal identity ot it. After listening to this CD, it sounds like he’s a guy I want to get to know better.

What Is XMarsX?

I was wondering this when I saw it popping up on music stores’ upcoming releases jazz list. I was glad I looked into it. Turns out this is one of the side projects of Liquid Soul’s Mars Williams. It’s a free jazz project that sounds like something fans of modern jazz will want to try out.
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George Duke Goes Indie

George Duke - Face the MusicIt’s the year of major modern jazz artists striking out on their own. Branford Marsalis released Footsteps of Our Fathers earlier this year on his own label, Marsalis Music. Now George Duke has released his first album on his label, BPM (Big Piano Music). Face the Music was released September 3 and consists of mostly instrumentals. “The basic idea for this project was to use the same rhythm section for the entire album,” Duke says. “Though there are horns and vocals in spots, the rhythm section is the focus and identity of the music.” The rhythm section consists of Christian McBride and John Roberts.
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Joshua Redman Quote

I read a quote from Joshua Redman in a recent Borders magazine. I thought it was appropriate for the first entry at this site.

“Jazz is going in all different directions now, and most are wonderful. There are great musicians with really original things to say. The music is in a really wonderful, creative time. Jazz is mixing with other forms of music, but there is no one next step.

We have to stop seeing the development of jazz – or the development of any art – in this kind of linear progression. Each step is a little bit higher than the one before. There’s always a next obvious step, which represents obvious progress and linear evolution from what came before. That’s a very modernist conception and it’s worked for a long time. But I think this is more of a postmodern age. It’s less about the next big thing or the next logical extension of what’s happening. It’s more about all these different possible creative avenues that are being explored.”
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Review: Hiroshima – Between Black and White

Hiroshima celebrates 25 years as a band this year and 20 years since the group first hit the instrumental charts. Their unique East-meets-West sound is on full display on their Windham Hill debut, Between Black and White. Hiroshima continues to effectively blend contemporary jazz with traditional Japanese elements and urban influences. “We’ve always stood apart from other instrumental groups of our time by taking the graceful classical sound of the koto and experimenting with varying American musical idioms around that,” says leader/co-founder Dan Kuramoto. “We create musically a cross-commentary about a multitude of cultures that comes from our backgrounds as Asian Americans growing up in a racially diverse America.”

Between Black and White features a diverse plate of sounds. In addition to the familiar sounds of June Kuramoto on koto and Johnny Mori on the taiko drum, the CD features instrumentation such as bongos, the Hammond B-3 organ, the shakuhachi, vibraphone, and the flan. Guest artist Karen Hwa-Chee plays the Er-hu, a Chinese violin whose origin dates back 5000 years, on the gorgeous “Dreams.” Another gentle, noteworthy track is “After the Rain,” which features sweet interaction between June and guest musician Hammer Smith on the chromatic harmonica. Of the twelve songs, only two feature vocals and those are more in the style of the band’s mid-80s songs like “Tabo” and “A Thousand Cranes” than the more urban-inspired songs featured in later recordings.

If you haven’t picked up a Hiroshima CD in a while, or if you’re looking for quality contemporary jazz that isn’t constrained by today’s smooth jazz format, or even if you just want to try something new, I recommend getting Between Black and White.