Remembering Chuck Loeb

Contemporary jazz lost one of its great contributors on July 31, 2017 when Chuck Loeb passed away. Loeb had been on the scene for decades and was one of those guys who could compose and produce just as well as he could play guitar. Whenever I saw his name on the credits of a song, I knew it had a higher chance of being something I’d enjoy.  It would be quality.

Chuck Loeb

The number of contemporary jazz recordings he’s been a part of must be in the hundreds. I remember a time in the ’90s when every CD that came to the radio station was produced by either Loeb or Paul Brown. In addition to a longtime solo career and many collaborations, he worked with Stan Getz and played with bands like Steps Ahead, Metro and Fourplay.  The latter posted: “We, The Fourplay family, salute our fallen hero Chuck Loeb … Our band member, our dear friend, our soulmate, our musical composer, an incredible human being, husband and father. Thank you for sharing your love, life and music with us.”

Chuck had battled cancer for several years. He is survived by his wife Carmen Cuesta Loeb and daughters Lizzy and Christina.

Freddie Hubbard Has Died

It seems like a musician that had an impact on the style I enjoy listening to today always dies around the Christmas holiday. This year, it’s Freddie Hubbard. He passed away today after suffering a heart attack in late November. He played with legends John Coltrane, Sonny Rollins, and Art Blakey. He was a star on the CTI label in the early 70s – Red Clay was the first recording he did for the label. He jammed with the VSOP (Very Special One-Time Performance) band of Herbie Hancock, Wayne Shorter, Tony Williams, and Ron Carter in 1977.

Freddie from the 1987 Mt. Fuji Jazz Festival – with James Spaulding, alto sax; Renee Rosnes, piano; Kenny Davis, bass; Ralph Peterson, drums:

Remembering Grover

Every December, I remember Grover Washington, Jr., a contemporary jazz legend. He died nine years ago, on December 17. He had a distinctive sound and a number of hits that are still remembered and played to this day. He made a lasting impression on me when I saw him rock the house in St. Louis in 1993 (with then newbie Norman Brown opening). He had the crowd in a frenzy. He blew his ass off!

Here he is, in his prime, from a 1983 performance in Japan:

Marc Moulin Has Died

I knew Marc Moulin’s acid jazz/nu jazz music from his Blue Note release here entitled Top Secret. I think it’s the only one of his Blue Note recordings issued here. However, as I just learned, he had a long-lived career starting with a fusion band called Placebo and including the electro-pop band Telex. He died of cancer on September 26 at the age of 66.

Tom Van Hout posted an Ode to Marc in his blog, writing “It is hard to do justice to Marc’s genius, but here’s an attempt at doing just that. What many people disqualify as ‘lounge music’ or ‘nu jazz’ – recall the St. Germain hype – draws on the jazz electro sound Marc Moulin pioneered.”

News: Oscar Peterson Tribute, David Benoit, John Beasley Tribute To Herbie Hancock

Quincy Jones, Herbie Hancock, Stevie Wonder, and Nancy Wilson were among the musicians who paid tribute to the late Oscar Peterson on January 12 at Toronto’s Roy Thomson Hall. The event, titled “Oscar Peterson: Simply the Best” saw 2500 fans offering a final farewell to the legendary pianist. He died on December 23, at the age of 82, of kidney failure. Several good recaps of the emotional goodbye were written by J.D. Considine, John Stewart (for the Mississauga News), and Scott Anderson (for Reuters). An archive is available at the CBC site. Share your thoughts on Oscar Peterson in The Forum.

David Benoit counts Oscar Peterson as one of his influences. The contemporary jazz pianist is recording an album of compositions from his favorite artists, including Peterson, Miles Davis, Bill Evans, Dave Brubeck, the Doors, the Beatles, and Elton John. It’s titled Heroes and will be out this year.

Also on the topic of tributes: John Beasley has been working on a tribute to Herbie Hancock. He’s joined by Roy Hargrove, Christian McBride and Jeff “Tain” Watts. The recording, expected in March, is the one of the first on a new label called Resonance Records. According to the press release, Resonance Records artists “benefit from an innovative revenue-sharing concept that not only offers greater economic return, but also allows them to produce their music without the typical studio time restrictions and their related expenses.”